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Ethan Iverson & Ron Carter

The Bad Plus pianist knows the value of living history – he’s made a point of interacting with elders during the last few years, and to a one, come away with intriguing results. At 41 Iverson is about the half the age of his partner, a revered bass master who has become one of improvisation’s icons after a lifetime of extraordinary work. Their book of duets will stress standards, and the give ‘n’ take in such a cozy room – designed specifically for this kind of intimacy – will explode the goose pimple factor.

Oct. 9-11, 8:30 p.m., 2014

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Dave King

Watching the Bad Plus drummer shift gears while constantly recalibrating tension is one of jazz’s more reliable joys. For this Gowanus hit, King matches wits with formidable NYC improvisers Tim Berne, Matt Mitchell, and Craig Taborn. He also brings his Trucking Company quintet, whose gnarled bop always manages to dispense a smile or three. Also on the bill: the Gang Font, his mildly mathy outfit that gives iconic bassist Greg Norton plenty of leeway for expression.

March 7-9, 8:15 & 9:30 p.m., 2014

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Chris Speed Trio

The saxophonist/clarinetist launches a six-day residence at John Zorn’s no-frills bunker with two evenings celebrating the release of Really OK by his excellent trio with bassist Chris Tordini and drummer Dave King (Happy Apple, the Bad Plus). Promising nights ahead include Human Feel with special guest Mary Halvorson on Thursday and the Clarinets on Friday, with Oscar Noriega and Anthony Burr joining Speed on their respective licorice sticks.

Tue., March 11, 8 & 10 p.m., 2014

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The Bad Plus

There has always been a dollop of ceremony in the esteemed trio the Bad Plus’s rerouted pop tunes and noble-nasty originals, so when they spend New Year’s Eve at our most venerable jazz club, there’s some version of extraordinary in the air. Plus, they’re smitten with surprise, and it’s always nice to feel that anything can happen on the cusp of a new 3-6-5.

Tue., Dec. 31, 9:30 p.m., 2013

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Tootie Heath, Ethan Iverson, & Ben Street

The members of this inter-generational trio milk each other’s fortes on the new Tootie’s Tempo, meaning swing and swagger overlap, yesterday high fives tomorrow, and poignancy nibbles on the ear of playfulness. There’s plenty of breathing room when the Bad Plus pianist connects with 78-year-old drum legend, and along with bassist Street’s signature agility, they make flapper anthems, Mancini melodramas, and Paul Motian fever dreams sound like birds of a feather.

Aug. 28-Sept. 1, 8:30 & 10:30 p.m., 2013

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REBEL REBEL

Jazz fans rarely think of the Bad Plus as traditionalists, but the most celebrated and scrutinized piano trio of the past decade certainly seems to be the go-to crew for ringing in the new year at the Village Vanguard. Revelers who want to kiss the old year goodbye with a dab of poignancy while splashing into the great unknown have found that a visit to the revered jazz cellar is a must when the band is holding forth. It remains remarkable that drummer Dave King, bassist Reid Anderson, and pianist Ethan Iverson can straddle that line of sensitivity and ferociousness, but “Pound for Pound,” from this year’s Made Possible is both steely and bittersweet. Their approach nudges everything towards the majestic, so expect even a momentary “Auld Lang Syne” to boast an epic vibe. And don’t forget to go back and check ’em on a normal old Thursday night.

Mon., Dec. 31, 9:30 p.m., 2012

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Ethan Iverson, Larry Grenadier & Paul Motian

The Bad Plus pianist treats his extracurricular activities with a refreshing informality. When he blows through jazz nuggets such as “Good Bait” or “Little Melonae,” he likes to slap ’em around a bit. The deconstruction comes naturally–Iverson and associates always swing. From Billy Hart to Tootie Heath, he’s been test-driving elder drummers of late, so his reconnection with superhero Motian should be sweet.

March 2-6, 9 & 11 p.m., 2011

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The Bad Plus

It didn’t dawn on me until I spent time with the new Never Stop, but the Bad Plus’s famed flourishes are sometimes tsunamis of catharsis. There’s an emo aspect to the originals that populate the disc, with Ethan Iverson’s piano pining at various points and Dave King’s drums fueling anthemic expressionism. It’s even in the ballads: can’t recall them ever offering more pathos than they do on “Snowball.” This big stage might bolster such oversized notions. Saxophonist Sam Newsome opens.

Wed., Sept. 15, 8 p.m., 2010

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Ethan Iverson & Mark Turner

When the Bad Plus pianist Iverson turns his attention to standards and drops into local clubs with like-minded pals, he brings his considerable imagination with him. So free-range romps might conclude with a Tin Pan Alley head, and nuggets from the great American songbook might have some Silly Putty applied to them. Saxophonist Turner is skilled at this as well; I’m recalling a “Skylark” that not only had a protractor in its back pocket, but lots of heart on its sleeve. Bassist Reid Anderson and drummer Nasheet Waits won’t let anyone drift for too long.

Wed., Aug. 4, 9:30 p.m.; Thu., Aug. 5, 9:30 p.m., 2010

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BAD TIDINGS

Critics effuse about The Bad Plus being “highbrow”—but then some of us maintain that Nirvana was just that, too. So when this experimental jazz trio covers “Lithium,” it’s not a contrast of peaks and valleys, of low meets high, but just an audacious idea perfectly executed; the troupe skips merrily around time signatures and genres, updating Stravinsky and Pink Floyd with intrepid flair—straight, no gimmick.

Fri., Jan. 1, 9 & 11 p.m., 2010