Tag: Roger Corman

  • “King Cohen” Makes the Case for the Artistry of an Exploitation Film Hero

    The too-easy shorthand description of legendary exploitation filmmaker Larry Cohen is that he’s New York’s answer to Roger Corman. The two share an affinity for the weirder margins of storytelling, have made cult hits with enduring fame for a dime, and possess a mighty work ethic that keeps them creating from morning till night, even […]

  • “Dementia 13”: What If Francis Ford Coppola Remade “Psycho”?

    “You’ve got a picture, kid!” That’s what cult movie impresario Roger Corman told a 24-year-old Francis Ford Coppola — the assistant and second-unit director he had hired right out of film school — after the young man pitched a gothic knockoff of Hitchcock’s Psycho with a lot of ax murders and sex. Corman mandated that […]

  • Neander-Jin: The Return of the Neanderthal Man’s Strained and Laughless Comedy

    For similar reasons to why budget-stretching pioneer Roger Corman recently produced schlock called Piranhaconda and Dinoshark (but not that ripoff Sharknado), director-producer Florian Steinbiss’s German-set, largely German-cast comedy mixes genres with all the quality control of a fourth-grader dispensing every soda flavor into one cup. Co-starring as a professor and father, Steinbiss—who apparently grew up […]

  • Cops and Novelists: Elmore Leonard, Donald Westlake, and other moonlighting screenwriters

    Now in its third go-around, Anthology Film Archives’ recurring “From the Pen of . . .” series foregrounds that most unheralded contributor to the potluck art of filmmaking: the screenwriter—frequently treated in auteurist criticism as a necessary prosaic inconvenience in a medium whose quintessence is visual poetry. This “From the Pen of . . .” […]

  • Corman’s World: Exploits of a Hollywood Rebel

    Bio-doc Corman’s World examines the maverick legacy of Roger Corman, who made his reputation, such as it is, beginning in the ’50s as the director of dashed-off gangster movies, horror-comedies, Edgar Allan Poe adaptations, and motorcycle pics for American International Pictures. In these films and, beginning in 1970, as budget mogul of his own New […]

  • The Intruder

    Dir. Roger Corman (1962). Possibly the most alarming B movie of 1962, Corman’s anti-segregationist screen-scorcher, shot on location in an Ozark town, is both ferociously topical and impressively timeless. William Shatner’s pre-Star Trek turn as the ultimate rabble-rousing white devil is a performance as unprecedented in its way as Andy Griffith’s in A Face in […]

  • The Intruder

    Dir. Roger Corman (1962). Possibly the most alarming B movie of 1962, Roger Corman’s anti-segregationist screen-scorcher, shot on location in an Ozark town, is both ferociously topical and impressively timeless. William Shatner’s pre Star Trek turn as the ultimate rabble-rousing white devil is a performance as unprecedented in its way as Andy Griffith’s in A […]

  • ‘Roger Corman: Poe and Beyond’ at Anthology

    When Roger Corman receives his Honorary Oscar next month at the Academy’s inaugural Governors Awards ceremony, will it be for his career as a director, an impresario, or both? The Academy’s official press release plays things straight down the middle, crediting Corman equally for his own films (more than 50 as director) and for his […]

  • Bloody Mama

    Dir. Roger Corman (1970). American-International’s last topic outrage was a mutant Bonnie and Clyde starring Shelley Winters as ‘30s crime queen Ma Barker. Monstrous mother hen to a brood of sexually anarchic, drug-addled hillbilly trash, Ma runs her family (whose members include Bruce Dern and Robert De Niro) as though it were a cult—the movie […]

  • Death Race

    It’s not that 1975’s Roger Corman–produced Death Race 2000 was so precious a grindhouse treasure that a remake seems offensive—but by running over the blunt social commentary on audience bloodlust in dire economic times, the newly homogenized Death Race has become the very product the original satirized. (Did we not learn anything from Rollerball?) Jason […]