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The Avengers: Journalists of the Right Rejoice

A happy new year to you, and now let’s lend an ear to some of our more prominent national commentators who have in the last few weeks or days proposed:

• The mining of Iranian harbors;
• The threatened mining of Cuban ports;
• The theorem that opposition to General Haig’s appoint­ment is tantamount to appeasement of the Soviet Union;
• The resurrection of the House and Senate Internal Security committees;
• The appointment of Henry Kissinger as secretary of state;
• The notion that Ronald Reagan has confirmed the view of 19th century German philosophers that “if we could but pierce the veil of appearances we would see that History is intelligible, logical and progressive.”
• The … but let us pause for a moment, doff our hats, and listen to the words of James Reston, vintage ’45:

“The principle that governs the press, or should govern it, is that the selling of news is a public trust. When the reporter writes a story that affects the interests of the people and the newspaper sells it, they in effect say to the reader: here is the truth to the best of our knowledge; these are the true facts; you can base your judgement on them, in the full knowledge that in this country the judgements of the people de­termine our actions as a na­tion.

“The same kind of rela­tionship exists between a doc­tor and his patients. The doc­tor affects the physical well-being of his patients; the reporter affects the men­tal well-being of his readers; unlike the doctor, the reporter is neither asked nor permitted to prescribe what his readers need to make them ‘well.’ But, like the doctor, he has the opportunity to poison them, and the main difference, it seems to me, is merely that the reporter can poison more of them quicker than the doctor.

“The reporter is thus performing a social and public service of the highest possible value …”

It’s a little unclear, actually, whether Reston was talking about the provision of truth or poison when he invoked “service of the highest possible value.” That was back in 1945. Today, certainly, it’s just a matter of citing poison of choice.

Every age gets the journalism it de­mands and the journalism it deserves. Right now, ankle-deep in the Reagan era, the situation looks pretty grim.

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A Straight Line
The proposals quoted at the start of this article stem from William Safire, Nor­man Podhoretz, Patrick Buchanan, James Reston, and (the one about History) George Will. These propagandists and their colleagues on publications from The Wall Street Journal to The New Republic — a shorter distance than you might sup­pose — are the paramount cantsmen of our time, our ranking opinion molders, hegemonic, as poor old Gramsci used to say.

Once in a while newspapers and news magazines take an interest in facts and encourage reporters to go out and discover them. Probably the last time this occurred was in the “investigative era” of Water­gate. Facts everywhere you looked back in 1974, and the readers couldn’t get enough of them. Investigative journalism was the dominant idiom. But it all dragged to a halt in the late ’70s and our friends the cantsmen took over as the dominant force.

By way of illustration, consider the coverage given of Richard Allen. All through the campaign of 1980 Allen was Reagan’s chief foreign-policy adviser. The Voice, in early summer, raised the possi­bility of a million-dollar bribe request from Allen when he was in the Nixon White House. No commotion ensued, which was not particularly surprising. On the eve of the Republican convention Mother Jones displayed the slimier aspects of Allen’s record in considerable detail. In the brave old days of full-tilt investigative journalism Allen would have been denying on the first day, unavailable the next, and over the side of the Good Ship Reagan by cock-crow on the third. Not in 1980. Then, on the eve of the election, Jonathan Kwitny of The Wall Street Journal gave Allen’s record a heavy dose of carpet-bombing. This time Allen did take himself out of the Reagan com­paign. Not for long. Here he is, back again as national-security adviser to President-­elect Reagan and not much the worse for his experience.

It isn’t that investigative journalists did not do their best, it’s more that nobody particularly cared. Same thing with Haig. When news of his impending appointment as secretary of state began to circulate, The Washington Post dutifully stamped on his fingers, reciting infamies of the (bad old days of) Watergate. Anthony Lewis uproared in The New York Times. Reagan smiled, went to the barbershop (“Get me the president!” “He’s under the drier.”) and the nomination of Haig proceeded apace. The Washington Post stamped on his fingers a little harder, displaying at length his record as an accomplice in crimes and misdemeanors, and all reliable sources agreed that his confirmation is virtually assured.

Time was when the announcement that the prospective secretary of labor was in the construction business in northern New Jersey would have sent the investigative teams surging forth high in heart and appetite. In fact someone did surge forth, and duly reported that there was this little matter of a payment to a political slush fund and so forth, and next thing you knew everyone was talking about the Times Sunday magazine story on the de la Rentas. (“In the rarefied atmosphere of New York society, Francoise and Oscar de la Renta have created a latter-day salon for le nouveau grand monde — the very rich, very powerful and very gifted.” Hard to know where that leaves the magazine’s editor, Ed Klein, but that’s another story.)

So far has the pendulum swung that when Ronald Reagan came out from under the drier to suggest that it was really enormously big-hearted of these big busi­nessmen to momentarily abandon their huge salaries and sink their teeth into big government — a step down, I think he said­ — no one got too exercised at this particular way of commending a cabinet to the coun­try.

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Opinion in Disguise
Outrage has become a sort of hiccup: Reagan appoints his personal attorney; Reagan appoints noted phone-tapper; Reagan appoints pre-eminent environ­mental rape & pillage man to run Interior; Reagan … Oh well. Then he calls the Iranians “barbarians” and vanishes under the drier again.

What has happened is investigative journalism — conducted from the liberal end of the journalistic end of the spectrum — was the appropriate mode to deal with Watergate. In its period of baroque decline which followed, it became the weapon with which William Safire harried the Carter administration. Bad luck for Bert Lance, but it didn’t do much, long-term, for investigative journalism.

Amid the ebb of investigative journal­ism, opinion mongering became the pre­ferred mode, in reconsolidating consensus post-Vietnam and in battering flat the fringe of progressive or liberal ideas that accompanied Jimmy Carter into office in 1976. The opinion-mongers sometimes came in semi-disguise.

Consider the post of what we may call the national security correspondent of The New York Times. Once upon a time this slot was filled by Leslie Gelb. In this particular firmament, pre-Carter, he could be described as a liberal in matters of defense, arms sales, and so forth. He later joined Cyrus Vance’s State Depart­ment. Gelb’s place was taken by Richard Burt, formerly of the Institute of Strategic Studies in London, who vastly impressed A. M. Rosenthal as the person best suited to bring some hawkish snap back into the Times‘s defense-cum-national security coverage in the Carter era.

For four years Burt banged the Brzezinski/Brown drum in The New York Times. Now paralleling the elevation of Gelb, he is accompanying Haig into the State Department. This job at the Times is becoming so politicized that Rosenthal should properly hold confirmation hear­ings for his successor.

There is, then, the Richard Burt type of opinion-mongering, dressed up in the cloak and whiskers of “high sources,” “high of­ficials,” and “intelligence analysts.” In­sidious and highly effective. People stopped talking about Pentagon boondog­gles and cost overruns (old days of in­vestigative-journalism) and began to worry about the encryption menace to SALT II.

With that treaty now trodden safely underfoot, maybe the trend will swing back to boondoggles. Grumman made the enormous mistake of allowing the civilian sector (New York City) to examine one of its products at close quarters. Perhaps someone will ask why we should believe that a corporation which cannot get a bus to the next corner can get a plane to the next war.

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Role Call
But nowadays, Burt aside, most opin­ion comes dressed nakedly, as opinion. The day of the conservative columnist, editorialist, even “news analyst” has come round again: The tasks are simple enough: restoration of confidence in conservative ideas, business ideals, and imperial verve. The executives are familiar, in the shape of Safire, George Will, Buckley, the Com­mentary gang, the editorials of The Wall Street Journal, Peretz’s slice of The New Republic, the Georgetown mob, the Kissinger claque (overlapping), and the ideo­logical imperatives more or less summed up in the thoughts of Norman Podhoretz and the Mobil commentaries.

The executive-level columnists operate in differing tempi of malignity. There are the traditional courtiers: a Hugh Sidey in Time, a Reston in The New York Times, for whom the essential project is to crook the pregnant hinges of the knee and gobble cock. Whether Nixon’s, Rockefeller’s, Ford’s, Carter’s, or now Reagan’s is almost irrelevant. Form here dominates content.

Such courtiers aside, you can take your pick in almost any paper from here to Los Angeles: the manly parafascism of a Bu­chanan or a Buckley, whose recent trip to Latin America produced a rich trove for his fans, as in this magnanimous report on the Pinochet regime: “But no American can say, with any sense of historical au­thority, what liberty he would now be enjoying if he had had a bout with Salvador Allende. Certainly those Ameri­cans who wrote the laws governing licit political activity in Germany after Hitler understand what some people consider to be the imperatives of political re-educa­tion.”

For those who find these two a little raw, there is the high-toned approach of George Will, who preferred Baker to Bush and Bush to Reagan until, the victor clear­ly in view, he discovered that the Califor­nian had realized the views of the German philosophers quoted here. Since he quotes dead people a lot, Will is commonly re­garded as a man of culture and refine­ment. And as befits such a gentleman, you sometimes have to read him twice to dis­cover what he is actually saying. For ex­ample: “In the 1970s the nation deferred investment in productive capacity, de­ferred investment in defense, even de­ferred having babies. I do not think it is fanciful to see a connection between the conservative tide from the polling booths and the bustle of activity in maternity wards. The decade of deferment is over. The nation now says what the philosopher says (Waylon Jennings, philosophizing in song about Luckenbach, Texas): ‘It’s time we got back to the basics of life.’ ”

The notion here seems to be that the Democratic way of life is sterile, that “the basics” amount to having babies and then wars to get rid of the results. This is like the recent endorsement of the American insurance companies for fat— that Ameri­cans should be fatter, and thus more able to tolerate chemotherapy in old age. Given Reagan’s plans for the environment (cancer), this may not be such a bad plan.

For those who find Will a shade pom­pous there is Emmett Tyrrell Jr., pasticheur in sub-Menckenese, for Meg Greenfield, high priestess of The Washing­ton Post ed and op ed, representative of neo-conservatism with a human face. The prose is cute but not the sentiments, at least au fond as we say in the restaurant business.

I could ramble on down the broad high­ways of mainline journalistic con­servatism: and sometimes it is almost comical to spend a morning’s newspaper reading trudging through the familiar ter­rain, from Kraft to Evans & Novak to the incoherent hysteria of the New York Post‘s editorial columns.

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Safire’s Passive Bombs
Liberals often confess to a frisson of pleasure in reading an artful dodger like Safire. And his views are indeed sometimes diverting, as in, “The idea [Safire’s, or Nixon’s, not always clear whose] is to threaten to mine Cuba’s four main ports. Mines are a passive weapon; no ships are sunk unless they choose to detonate the mines …” In the same way, we must assume that bombs are passive, in the sense that no one is killed unless he stands underneath one.

There are even enthusiasts for Norman Podhoretz, living illustration of the fact that structural paranoia is no impediment to success in public life.

But these pleasures should be dis­missed as nostalgia for a way of life that has gone, when Podhoretz was merely Making It, and Safire the distraught apologist for Nixon in his early pundit days. They are now both swimming securely in the mainstream, one giving ideas to Reagan, the other getting them from Nixon, both secure in public esteem. From Podhoretz to Moynihan to Kirkpatrick to Peretz to Jackson to Safire … Bipartisan consensus, ready to march to the ports of Cuba, the harbors of Iran, the domino of EI Salvador. Throw in a brisk bout of witch-hunting, as in the treatment of the Institute for Policy Studies, and you will see how far the clock has moved on — and back — from the high days of Watergate. The mainline press is, more firmly than ever, under the thumb and padlock of the powers that be.

It hasn’t taken long to get the political culture under control again after Vietnam and Watergate: the academics are quiet, the public-interest movement reeling, the poor subdued, and the broad acres of newsprint relatively undisturbed by dis­commoding ideas with only the occasional white tail of a liberal rabbit scuttling across the pastures. So far as ideological consensus is concerned, amid the hosan­nas and homilies of the cantspeople, the stage is set. ❖

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Obama Back in New York To Hobnob With Jay-Z; GOP Pissy (Redux)

President Barack Obama will be back in the Big Apple to hobnob with celebrities, and — per usual — the state’s Republicans are pissy about it.

The “fundraiser in chief” will be in Manhattan tonight, where he will party with Jay-Z and Beyoncé at a $40,000-a-person fundraiser at the rappers 40/40 Club.

New York Republican Party Chairman Ed Cox is using the occasion to slam the president over the current unemployment numbers, and note that “Obama snubs [Benjammin] Netanyahu” to party with Jay-Z instead.

]
“Against this backdrop, Israeli leader Benjamin Netanyahu asked Barack Obama for
a meeting,” Cox says. “Obama turned down the request from the leader of
America’s closes ally in the Middle East. Instead, the President of the
United States will be hobnobbing with Jay-Z and Beyonce at a
$40,000-per-person, 100-person fundraiser at the swank 40/40 Club –
that’s a cash haul of $4 million for the President.”

See Cox’s entire statement below:

“Once
again, we’re happy to welcome President Obama back to New York State,
where our unemployment rate (9.1%) is a full point above the national
average.

America and the world are in crisis: unemployment is still high, our
national debt has topped $16 trillion, our embassies are burning and
Iran is closer than ever to becoming a nuclear nation.

Against this backdrop, Israeli leader Benjamin Netanyahu asked Barack Obama for a meeting.

Obama turned down the request from the leader of America’s closes ally in the Middle
East.

Instead, the President of the United States will be hobnobbing with Jay-Z and Beyonce
at a $40,000-per-person, 100-person fundraiser at the swank 40/40 Club – that’s
a cash haul of $4 million for the President.

Put another way, Obama will leave New York with $4.68 for every one of our state’s
unemployed workers.

America needs a President more interested in the status of our allies abroad and
 our unemployed at home than in partying with celebrities: America needs Mitt Romney
in the White House.”

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NEWS & POLITICS ARCHIVES THE FRONT ARCHIVES Washington, D.C.

GOP Convention Underway: Meet Your “Extreme” Candidates For Senate Right Here

New York’s GOP convention kicked off today in Rochester, and state Dems are using the occasion to sling a little mud at the three Republican candidates for Senate — and by “mud,” we mean facts.

Three GOP hopefuls for the Senate seat held by Senator Kirsten Gillibrand are Manhattan attorney Wendy Long, Nassau County Comptroller George Maragos, and Congressman Bob Turner, who took the seat when Anthony Weiner left Congress in disgrace.

State Dems have determined that all three candidates are “extreme,” and that the Party itself is in “total chaos and disarray.”

“Extreme” may be a stretch — all three candidates just seem like run-of-the-mill Republicans; none support gay marriage, all oppose abortion, and they each support tax cuts for the wealthy, according to Democratic Committee Chairman Jay Jacobs.

“Even for the New York State Republican Party, they are in total chaos
and disarray this year in a never-ending search for a credible candidate
that can match up with the enormously effective Senator Gillibrand,” Jacobs says.
“They are running on empty heading into a divisive primary of who can
pander to the Tea Party the most over the coming months.”

The Dems sent us over some dopey comments that each of the candidates have made over the years to help illustrate their point that they’re all lunatics.

For example, this is how Long feels about gay marriage: “Who says I can’t marry my mother? You and I love our dogs. Who says we can’t marry our dogs? The rational, and it’s not to cast any assertions
or to discredit my mother or the dog. It’s simply saying there are no
principle distinctions. There’s no principle distinction to why you and I
and five other people can’t get married. If we wanted to form a commune
and say we are married” (Laura Ingraham via Denny Burke, 8/5/10).

As for her thoughts on “rights,” Long says “Our rights come from God. They don’t come from the state” (MSNBC, 9/14/05).

Well…god can’t issue a pistol permit. Where do we get those, Wendy?

Here’s Maragos’ take on contraception and women’s rights: “It has
nothing to do with the health and well-being of women in this case.
Contraception is readily available to everyone” (Capital Tonight, 2/20/12, see 1:15 min mark).

As for his thoughts on gay marriage, Maragos says “Some people would even like to marry with their pets,”
worried that the legalization of gay marriage could also lead to the
legalization of polygamy — and apparently bestiality, too [The Island Now, 8/24/11].

Click here to read a story we did a few years ago about a self-described “zoosexual,” who told us that while he loves sex with horses, he has no interest in marrying one. In other words, even people who are into that sort of thing don’t always want to tie the knot with an animal.

Then there’s the following foot-in-mouth moment from when Maragos discussed his previous attempt to run for Senate against Senator Chuck Schumer: “It wasn’t a serious attempt against Schumer. It was a reason to go around the state and visit
county chairs” [City & State, 8/19/11].

As for Turner, only one of the quotes the Dems sent over inspired an instant face-palm (he’s only been in office for a few months — give him time), and, like Long, it has to do with divine authority.

“God makes the rules and we have to abide by
them. That is in the Constitution. The Founding Fathers were all
Christians and this is a Christian nation. That would be a good thing to
teach our children. That is a yes. You are talking about religion as
opposed to belief in God. You can teach that there is a creator of
every- thing. That is woven into the fabric of our nation” [The Wave, 10/29/10]
.

There you have it, GOPers — those are your options. Now go figure out who’s the nuttiest and vote accordingly.