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FUNNY PEOPLE

There’s a tragic only-in-America twist to “Stand Up for Heroes,” the New York Comedy Festival’s annual opening event. Co-sponsored by Veterans on Wall Street, tonight’s super-session features Louis C.K., Jim Gaffigan, John Oliver, Jon Stewart, Bruce Springsteen, and “surprise guests” who will attempt to apply wit’s wicked edge (and rock’s universal chops) to our country’s shameful treatment of its veterans. Part of comedy’s appeal is how it teases and torments our moral certainties, and few accomplish this with bigger net yuks than Tig Notaro (tomorrow at Town Hall), Hannibal Buress (Friday at Town Hall), Amy Schumer (Friday at Carnegie Hall), and Bob Odenkirk (Sunday at Gramercy Theater). Dane Cook (tomorrow and Friday at the Beacon Theatre) and Bill Cosby (Saturday at Carnegie Hall), on the other hand.

Wed., Nov. 5, 8 p.m., 2014

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THE DUDE ABIDES

Break out your best viking get-up, or, conversely, your worst sweater and dingiest robe. Tonight, “Achievers” can relive the all the magic and all the sloth of the Coen brothers’ classic. The Big Lebowski (1998) has spawned countless weed-induced college-dorm revelations, a certain special strain of hipster fashion, and even an officially recognized religion (Dudeism, for disciples of The Church of the Latter Day Dude). And with more attendees than ever to Lebowski Fest, this internationally touring, 12-year-running “natural, zesty enterprise,” the Dude’s influence is better preserved than his rug. Dress up for tonight’s bowling party (past costumes have included bowling pins and a severed toe) and know your trivia to compete for prizes. Tomorrow, Cover Me Badd performs punk rock Lebowski covers before a screening of the film at Gramercy Theatre. As always, White Russians are the prevailing beverage of choice. At 8, Lucky Strike Lanes, 42nd Street and 12th Avenue, 502-583-9290, lebowskifest.com, $25–$30 HEATHER BAYSA

Aug. 22-23, 8 p.m., 2014

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Mykki Blanco

Mykki Blanco recently posted the Facebook status update, “I’m over gender. I’m into species,” and paired it with an Apple Store selfie of the rapper looking like a silver-haired elfin space magistrate. Accordingly, La Blanca has assembled a merry band of cosmic mutants for a New Year’s bash at the Gramercy Theater: Expect post-sexual singer Ian Isiah’s cyborg r&b, juke wizard DJ Rashad’s Chicago futurism, Junglepussy and Princess Nokia’s tentacled raps, and intergalactic ferocity from DJ Larry B, T.E.A.M.S., Boychild, and Michael Magnan.

Tue., Dec. 31, 8 p.m., 2013

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GROUP LOVE

Maybe you have conflicted feelings about Girls—we read your Facebook post about it, we swear—but credit where credit’s due: Even though it was also the theme song for Snookie & JWoww, Icona Pop’s club-to-charts crossover anthem “I Love It” didn’t blow up to national audiences until a fishnet-clad Lena Dunham jumped up and down to its four-on-the-floor beat. In advance of their forthcoming This Is … Icona Pop, out September 24, the Swedish duo play Webster Hall with K. Flay and Sirah. Be on the lookout for Charli XCX: The impossibly talented 21-year-old Londoner featured on “I Love It” originally had her own Gramercy Theatre gig scheduled for tonight, but that’s been postponed to November and moved to Irving Plaza.

Fri., Sept. 20, 7 p.m., 2013

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MARK IT, DUDE

Say what you will about the tenets of Lebowskism, but at least it’s an ethos. Slip on your favorite bathrobe, and see what condition your condition is in this weekend at Lebowskifest. The party begins with tonight’s screening of 1998’s The Big Lebowski at Gramercy Theatre, with music by metal tribute band Los Duderinos, and Chipocrite, who’ll play the soundtrack on a GameBoy. Tomorrow at Bowlmor you can throw rocks, meet some surprise guests, and vie for prizes in trivia and costume contests. Assuming that, unlike Walter Sobchak, you roll on Shabbos.

Fri., April 19, 8 p.m., 2013

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Naughty by Nature

If you’re down with O.P.P., N.B.N., E.N.R. (umm, early ’90s rap?), or any combination thereof, come to the Gramercy Theatre

Sun., Feb. 24, 8 p.m., 2013

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Laughline

You can often find the wacky crew behind the comedy website CollegeHumor performing their best original sketches (check out “Sober Sex”) at the tiny Upright Citizens Brigade Theatre. But tonight, they’re going big at the Gramercy Theatre with CollegeHumor Offline. Hosted by CollegeHumor editor-in-chief Streeter Seidell, the show includes a set by Jake and Amir (who made Variety’s 2012 “10 Comics to Watch List”) and the first-ever live performance of Elaine Carroll’s “Very Mary-Kate.” Plus, Choco Tacos for all!

Thu., Aug. 2, 7 p.m., 2012

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The So So Glos Carry the Torch for New York Rock and Roll

It’s a Thursday night at Shea Stadium, and a girl goes by on roller skates while the So So Glos play. The place isn’t packed, but it’s a party anyway. The band careens around the stage while dropping straight power punk crammed with voice cracks and smart middle eights, wearing leather jackets, and looking straight from central casting in the best possible way. The crowd (save a few hippie-twirlers) careens similarly.

The scene ripples with irresistible giddiness, from the quartet’s songs to the DIY venue they operate. The East Williamsburg spot is almost devoid of decoration, save a wall-mounted thrift-store swordfish and a hand-painted Mets logo over a schematic of the team’s former ballpark. “STOP BLOG ROCK,” reads a stop sign atop the stairs.

This week, the quartet travels across the river to play the Gramercy Theatre as part of the CBGB Festival. Like the Ramones, the So So Glos can stake themselves as an actual New York band; the members were born in Bay Ridge, and in a way are equally genuine heirs to the departed venue’s much-exploited legacy. Unlike the Ramones, the Glos—Ryan and Alex Levine, plus stepbro Zach Staggers and honorary bro Matt Elkin—actually are brothers. Minus Elkin, they have been a band in some form for 20 years.

First, when Ryan was six and Alex was four, they were the Dinosaurs. “It wasn’t a contrived thing,” says Ryan, now 26. “We just liked dinosaurs.”

“I was calling myself T. rex,” says Alex, who quickly established himself as the frontman. “We were drowning out fragments of divorce.”

“They were drowning out divorce, too,” Ryan says of their parents. Their father had owned a record store in pre-hardcore-era D.C., and they soon sang along to every word of the Nirvana, Sex Pistols, and Jackson 5 tapes in Zach’s dad’s car. Eventually, they were exiled to the dreaded suburbs.

As SPITT, they churned out a ready-to-anthologize catalog of outsider kid-punk. “We were always really serious,” Ryan says. “We’d be like, ‘We’ve got to make an album,’ so we’d get out the karaoke machine. An album was done when the tape was done—both sides of the tape. Then we would make a cover for it.”

In the late ’90s, after a few more name changes (plus forays into rap-rock and ska), they auditioned at CBGB and invited everybody they knew. While the venue’s prestige might have declined by then, it remained an entry point for any band that wanted a gig, and the proto-Glos quickly wrote themselves into the club’s complicated late-period legacy. “We got kicked out after we played,” says Zach, who was 14 at the time. “I was buying drinks, and our friends came in drunk.”

Even when Ryan moved to Israel for a spell, music remained the focus. When he came back, the band became the So So Glos. “Are we going to change our name again?” Elkin asks. The brothers laugh.

It almost doesn’t matter, just as it wouldn’t matter if they were expelled from Shea for any of the reasons that do-it-yourself venues usually get expelled from their homes. “It’s an idea that can’t really be broken,” Alex says. He’s talking about DIY, but he could be talking about his own band.

Sick of playing the Lower East Side meat markets, they struck out on their own with the encouragement of Joe Ahearn, a founder of the free concert-listings broadsheet Showpaper and homesteader at Silent Barn. They organized a cross-country jaunt via MySpace (Elkin: “some Outward Bound shit for troubled youth”) and, when they returned, moved into a new communal pad in Bushwick. With the help of promoter Todd Patrick, they turned it into Market Hotel. A two-year relationship with the EMI subsidiary Green Owl resulted in a pair of rush-recorded releases, heart and headaches, and eventually DIY re-entrenchment.

In 2009, the lifelong Mets fans opened Shea Stadium—meaning that William Shea, a crony of community-destroying Robert Moses, had inadvertently given his family name to a community-building punk venue. The Friday of Johan Santana’s no-hitter, they partied well into the night and invited their Twitter followers over to celebrate. This kind of chaos might erupt anytime around the So So Glos; it’s equally inherent in the collective life they live and the music they make, their childhood intuitions only barely reined in by the song forms they’ve ingested.

They have a new album, Blowout, ready to go, and would be happy to release it themselves—at least in part to accommodate the follow-up they recently laid down in the home studio built at Shea by childhood pal Adam Reich.

“You guys have always lived together,” Elkin half-asks.

“We’ve always lived together,” Alex, Ryan, and Zach say—the same words, almost at the same time.

The So So Glos play Gramercy Theatre on July 6.

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THE BLOCK IS HOT

By now, the plot that would support a Clipse-themed Behind the Music is so well known that actually filming such an episode would be mostly redundant. Act I: Brothers form rap group, release hot singles then hot album produced by childhood friends the Neptunes. Act II: Brothers get shelved by label Jive, release astoundingly good mixtapes, but still can’t get a release date for their astoundingly good album. Act III: Brothers finally release album, which despite disappointing sales figures, cements their place as one of the decade’s premier rap groups. Tonight, catch the duo’s cleverer half, Pusha T, as he advances his solo story at the Gramercy Theatre.

Thu., Dec. 22, 7 p.m., 2011

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Immortal

In the five years since they’ve reunited, kabuki-faced Norwegian black-metallers Immortal have toured North America a few times, released a comeback album (2009’s excellent All Shall Fall) and, by proxy, restored their image as scene leaders rather than the butt of too many “Isn’t metal funny?” internet memes. They’ve started work on a new record but firstly, they can make up for the crappy sound quality of last year’s Masonic Temple show tonight at the more intimate Gramercy Theatre. With Absu.

Sat., Feb. 19, 8 p.m., 2011