Tag: Giorgio de Chirico

  • The Timelessness of Distance and Alienation in L’Avventura

    “It’s hard, keeping a relationship going when one’s here and the other’s there—but it’s easy, too,” one of the characters in L’Avventura quips. This prescient observation—that distance and alienation engender social relations as much as they encumber them—still rings true 53 years after the film’s release, at a cultural moment when technology simultaneously unites and […]

  • ‘Giorgio Morandi, 1890-1964’ at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

    Giorgio Morandi exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of art

    Early on in art school, an instructor of mine showed the class slides of Cézanne, Hopper, Balthus, and other stalwarts of modern figuration. Those monumental apples, existential interiors, and chiaroscuro Lolitas humbled the majority of us who’d rarely been to museums and appreciated only magazine illustrations or the chaotic stylings of something recently christened “MTV.” […]

  • Giorgio Morandi, 1890-1964

    Giorgio Morandi exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of art

    Early on in art school, an instructor of mine showed the class slides of Cézanne, Hopper, Balthus, and other stalwarts of modern figuration. Those monumental apples, existential interiors, and chiaroscuro Lolitas humbled the majority of us who’d rarely been to museums and appreciated only magazine illustrations or the chaotic stylings of something recently christened “MTV.” […]

  • Pop Continued: Warhol and the Art of the Perfect Throwaway

    The appetite and—more to the point—the market for Warhol ephemera would appear to be a bottomless maw, and there’s no end to the shows and books designed to tempt, if not satisfy, them. “Takes and Outtakes,” timed to celebrate both the 10th anniversary of the Warhol Museum and the publication of Andy Warhol: 365 Takes […]

  • Queneau-It-All

    Raymond Queneau essentially launched the hyper-playful Oulipo tradition with the famed Hundred Thousand Billion Poems—a series of 10 sonnets with perfectly interchangeable lines. But by then, Queneau had put in a life’s work already, including The Sunday of Life, infused with the author’s peculiar mix of metaphysics and melancholic sweetness; and the hilarious, astounding Exercises […]