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VOICE CHOICES ARCHIVES Where To

RUDE AWAKENING

APAP, the annual trade show for international performing artists and presenters, launches this week, and with it hundreds of showcases displaying talent in spaces ranging from the gargantuan to the miniature. Into the latter category falls Rude World, Molly Lieber and Eleanor Smith’s improvisation-based duet. The pair, working together since 2006, use movement as a way to understand feeling. Their two often naked bodies struggle with and support each other. Tonight they bring their storied collaboration back to Queens. To accommodate the scheduling vagaries of APAP delegates, each of their six forty-five-minute performances starts at a different hour; surely one of them will work for you.

Jan. 7-12, 6 p.m., 2015

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Neighborhoods NEW YORK CITY ARCHIVES NYC ARCHIVES VOICE CHOICES ARCHIVES Where To

DANCING IN THE STREET

Topologie, the opening salvo in DANSE, an 18-day, multi-venue celebration of “French-American performance and ideas,” is both free and peripatetic. Les gens d’Uterpan, Annie Vigier and Franck Apertet, provoke “the conditions for a new reflection on the different methods of representation, production and interpretation of dance,” not to mention the relation of performers to spectators. Five local dancers follow five distinct itineraries through the streets of Long Island City, analyzing the identity, characteristics, and construction of their individual territories, accompanied by a sound score played over streaming radio and at the Chocolate Factory, where you can pick up a map of the itineraries they’re charting. On closing day from 5 to 6, discuss the whole project with Vigier, Apertet, sound designer Nicolas Martz, and the CF’s Sheila Lewandowski at Brooklyn’s Invisible Dog Art Center.

Thu., May 1, 10 a.m., 2014

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ART ARCHIVES CULTURE ARCHIVES Theater

A Real-Life Apostate Drawn in Thick Campy Strokes in Uriel Acosta: I Want That Man!

Jewish history is the story of the underdog, so perhaps it’s natural that the characters in Target Margin Theater’s latest explorations in Yiddish drama bear some resemblance to the animated canine superhero, or any standard issue DC Comics defender. With capes trailing and blue spandex blazing, TMT flies up, up, and away into mock-heroic metaphor with the campy Uriel Acosta: I Want That Man!, which finishes off the second season of Beyond the Pale, a project of almost biblical proportions, with 23 productions in two years.

The actual Acosta was a 17th-century Portuguese Christian and Rationalist who converted to Judaism, was excommunicated for his radical views, recanted, committed suicide, and wound up a stock figure of Yiddish theater claimed and contested by rival actors. But his significance soars Superman-like over us in this 70-minute, go-go-booted exodus from the philosophical high ground of a real-life apostate to the murkier marshland of his numerous fictionalized representations.

Firebrand, scapegoat, lover, coward, tragic hero: Acosta’s many caricatures are drawn in thick strokes under David Herskovits’s direction. Brandishing a hand-held fog machine, projectors, and three toy theaters, the four Uriels (led by James Tigger! Ferguson) and two technicians part the seas of interpretation into multiple rivulets, which meander brightly for a while before drying up inconclusively. Regrettably, TMT’s years of research in Yiddish culture leave us high and dry in a desert of affected playacting when we might have reached a more promising land of ideas.