Categories
CULTURE ARCHIVES Datebook Events Listings MUSIC ARCHIVES VOICE CHOICES ARCHIVES Where To

OH, BOY!

Hot damn — the 4th Annual Boylesque Festival returns this weekend, in full frontal force. Tonight’s teaser party at the Knitting Factory is hosted by the World Famous *BOB* and comprises more than a dozen acts, including local ‘throbs Johnny Panic and Mr. Gorgeous, and more distant performers like SF’s Bohemian Brethren and Toronto’s James and the Giant Pasty. Saturday’s Main Event goes even farther abroad (or, perhaps, a-dude), with hunks from Tokyo, Paris, Australia, and more. Hosted by drag legend Sweetie, with more than twenty performers, it’s a veritable hornicopia. Teaser party at 8, Knitting Factory, 361 Metropolitan Avenue, Brooklyn, $15–$20; main event tomorrow at 7:30, B.B. King’s, 237 West 42nd Street.

May 8-10, 8 p.m., 2015

Categories
CULTURE ARCHIVES Datebook Events Listings MUSIC ARCHIVES VOICE CHOICES ARCHIVES Where To

OUT OF THE BOX

For New York fans, there may be no more appropriate place to talk baseball than at a blues club. But the Pitch: Talks on Baseball series, launching tonight, focuses on the upside: our love of the game. As Andre Barzun famously noted, “Whoever wants to know the hearts and mind of America had better learn baseball.” “Pitch” gives fans a chance to interact with sportswriters and commentators through discussion on all aspects of the game. Boston Globe beat writer Pete Abraham is the moderator, and panelists include ESPN’s Buster Olney and Adam Rubin, the New York Times’ Tyler Kepner, and Sports Illustrated’s Jay Jaffe. Enjoy storytelling, debates, and good conversation about the game.

Wed., Jan. 14, 7:30 p.m., 2015

Categories
CULTURE ARCHIVES Datebook Events Listings MUSIC ARCHIVES VOICE CHOICES ARCHIVES Where To

Kid ‘n’ Play

The halcyon pop-rap of Kid ‘n’ Play — that’s Christopher Reid and Christopher Martin to their mothers, and maybe yours, too — hearkens back to a gentler, more innocent period in hip-hop history, when balling meant macking on girls, getting fly, or one-upping your homies with boasts the whole crew knew were bullshit but laughed good-naturedly at anyway. Like much of that era, Kid ‘n’ Play were accessible, clean, corny, and laced with irresistible funk/jazz beats. This dynamic duo had the urban middle-class eating out of its hand during the Bush I era, parlaying this exposure into feature films (some featuring compatriots Full Force, who also perform tonight) most will more remember more immediately than its actual music. Now they’re back, in this era to make nostalgia waves and some bank. Get your tickets quick, as this will probably sell out in a heartbeat.

Sat., Sept. 6, 7:30 p.m., 2014

Categories
CULTURE ARCHIVES Datebook Events Listings MUSIC ARCHIVES VOICE CHOICES ARCHIVES Where To

Fabolous

When “Can’t Deny It” was first released, it wasn’t the cool, cocky delivery, chipped-tooth flow, or Nate Dogg’s Makavelian hook that captured everyone’s attention; similarly, “Young’n (Holla Back)” was always more than the sum of its slick rhymes and chipper Neptunes beat. Fab’s incredible wordplay and lush beats on “I’m So into You” and “Can’t Let You Go,” two crossover tracks that made 2003’s Street Dreams so great aren’t even the best part of Fab. Real Talk’s “Breathe” was a hot song, with an insistent Just Blaze production, but all of that is just icing on the cake. The thing that is most fascinating about Fabolous is how he spells his name: F-A-B-O-L-O-U-S. Where does that first “o” come from? What drove him to turn fabulous into Fabolous? Not all questions have answers, but Fab is unquestionably a veteran in the game now—quite possibly the only punchline rapper left.

Sun., Aug. 24, midnight, 2014

Categories
CULTURE ARCHIVES Datebook Events Listings MUSIC ARCHIVES VOICE CHOICES ARCHIVES Where To

Juelz Santana

“Santana is next,” Cam’ron famously declared on 2004’s Purple Haze, then, his protege’s solid grower What The Game’s Been Missing! notwithstanding, Santana wasn’t next. Oh, he didn’t fade away entirely: a solo mixtape here, a Skull Gang outing there, the supposed Lil Wayne collaborative LP that never came to fruition, the would-be singles that didn’t quite land. (“Mixin’ Up the Medicine” is straight fire.) But for the past nine years, Dipset stans have been denied a solid , cash-infused dose of this Harlem MC’s deceptively elementary wordplay; the title of his perpetually-delayed next LP, perhaps portentously, is Born To Lose, Built To Win.

Sun., June 8, 8 p.m., 2014

Categories
CULTURE ARCHIVES Datebook Events Listings MUSIC ARCHIVES VOICE CHOICES ARCHIVES Where To

Sheila E.

The Sheila E. of the mid-80s continues to linger in the mind as an image of the future. Back then, she dazzled as the perfect mouthpiece for throwaway Prince tunes like “Erotic City,” “A Love Bizarre,” and “The Glamorous Life,” perfectly suited for the robotic exoticism of E.’s post-racial beauty, flimsy (but tuneful) voice, and impeccable Latin drumming. In fact, these slices of metronomic funk draped in chintzy keyboards still sound like transmissions from the yet-to-come, hitting a sweet spot of pop, electro and lite-soul that no subsequent artist has since been able to achieve. Fortunately, Sheila continues to be a phenomenal drummer and bandleader.

Sat., May 31, 8 p.m., 2014

Categories
CULTURE ARCHIVES Datebook Events Listings MUSIC ARCHIVES VOICE CHOICES ARCHIVES Where To

NEW BEGINNING

If you want to really grasp how long Pharrell has been making music, think back to the 1993 “Human Nature” mix of SWV’s “Right Here,” the highlight of the trio’s career, and remember that his voice was the one shouting “S, the double, the U, the V” over the song’s intro. Twenty years later, the genius producer has the No. 1 single in the country, and the girl group that gave him one of his early breaks is playing B.B. King’s a month after their reality TV hit, SWV Reunited, finished its first season. Off-screen, the music still slams, and if you’re somehow sick of the group’s early ’90s hits, you’ll likely get a kick out of I Missed Us, the excellent 2012 comeback album that preceded the show.

Fri., March 21, 8 p.m., 2014

Categories
CULTURE ARCHIVES Datebook Events Listings MUSIC ARCHIVES VOICE CHOICES ARCHIVES Where To

‘The Legendary Tunnel Party’

Good thing that Cristal came wrapped in cellophane. There is no better metaphor for the nostalgia that has been cultivated around the now-legendary Tunnel: gold-tinted memories of a rebellious, adolescent hip-hop growing up from jumping turnstiles, eating ramen, rocking Fubu, drinking E&J and André to sitting in black Towncars, eating sushi, wearing shiny suits, and sipping on Hennessy and Cristal. The Tunnel represented a journey, and it took NY hip-hop out of the Golden Age and into the Bling Era as rappers, hustlers, and round-the-way girls all followed the Cristal-colored light towards the Millennium with its promise of Benjamins for all. Vivid memories, like cellophane, never disintegrate, and it’s easy to envision Funk Flex and Cipha Sounds unwrapping a 1996 vintage of Cris as they decided to uncork the Tunnel just so they could make their memories real again — and make a few Benjamins in the process.

Sun., March 9, midnight, 2014

Categories
CULTURE ARCHIVES Datebook Events Listings MUSIC ARCHIVES VOICE CHOICES ARCHIVES Where To

Eddie Palmieri Salsa Orchestra

The Grammy-winning NEA Jazz Master has spent the past half century taking the music of the barrio into the concert hall, but success hasn’t dulled the Latin pianist’s flavor or diminished his drive for live performance. At 77, Palmieri still pounds the keys Monk style with the same percussive fervor that he brought to Tito Rodriguez’s band in the ’50s or his own trombone-heavy Charanga groups in the ’60s and beyond. With ironclad claves and a blistering call-and-response aesthetic, he adheres to one inviolable rule: If it wouldn’t cut it on a dance floor (or an Olympic ice rink), don’t play it.

Wed., Feb. 19, 8 p.m., 2014

Categories
CULTURE ARCHIVES Datebook Events Listings MUSIC ARCHIVES NEW YORK CITY ARCHIVES NEWS & POLITICS ARCHIVES NYC ARCHIVES THE FRONT ARCHIVES VOICE CHOICES ARCHIVES Where To

ONE MORE CHANCE

The Tunnel was many things to many people: for house heads, a place to dance to DJs like Junior Vasquez and Danny Tenaglia; for young scenesters like Michael Alig and RuPaul, a place to see and be seen; for Rudy Giuliani, a nuisance in the way of Chelsea gentrification; and for New York City hip-hop fans, a place to get wild to the latest Jay-Z and B.I.G. records, as played by DJs like Cipha Sounds, Big Kap, and Funkmaster Flex. Tonight, that last group of clubgoers gets their day, as Flex and crew — joined by Canarsie’s DJ Riz, one of the quickest mixers in the city — come to B.B. King’s for a late-night reunion.

Fri., Jan. 31, 11:59 p.m., 2014