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MADE IN HER IMAGE

Over the course of her long career, photographer Deborah Feingold has often had to improvise: Her darkrooms have included a Boston prison cell and her apartment’s shower stall. The result, however, is extraordinary, with an oeuvre of subjects that define culture, including Barack Obama, Bill Gates, and Johnny Depp. Tonight, Feingold previews her new book, Music, to be released on September 30, which chronicles her epic rock photographs. Having lingered on the New York scene since 1976, her images capture greats like B.B. King, James Brown, and Madonna at their most candid. Feingold chats tonight with Anthony DeCurtis of Rolling Stone, telling the stories behind her iconic shots, like the time she secretly captured Mick Jagger, hands to his head with anxiety, after she told him the camera was broken.

Mon., Sept. 8, 7 p.m., 2014

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FORCES OF NATURE

After 40 years, Blondie have had a dream career spanning decades and genres as once-pivotal members of New York’s downtown punks working with the city’s uptown hip-hop heads. Together, the band remains unstoppably influential thanks to its perfectly constructed, catchy songs and Debbie Harry’s trailblazing feminist take on punk. Tonight, Harry and her partner in crime, Chris Stein, sit down with Rolling Stone’s Anthony DeCurtis to discuss four decades of a career together that has seen and conquered it all, hopefully relating some juicy tales along the way.

Wed., May 28, 8 p.m., 2014

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YOU OUGHTA KNOW

Throughout the years, Alanis Morissette has made an everlasting impression with unapologetic pop songs that are always on her terms—who can forget her breakout album, Jagged Little Pill? The Canadian singer-songwriter, who was rumored to be the next American Idol judge and frankly spoke about her postpartum depression after the birth of her first child, sits down with Rolling Stone contributing writer Anthony DeCurtis to discuss her latest album, Havoc and Bright Lights, her first release in four years. And with a repertoire of works that consists of eight studio albums and roles on the big and small screen (remember her on You Can’t Do That on Television?), there should be more than plenty to discuss.

Thu., Aug. 23, 8 p.m., 2012

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‘A Conversation with Alanis Morissette’

A week after the release of her sixth non-Canadian-teen-pop LP, Havoc and Bright Lights, Alanis Morissette is sitting down Rolling Stone contributing editor Anthony DeCurtis to talk about subjects not yet revealed for the 92Y. Safe guess, though, would be the new album, stories from around the time she released her 16-times platinum monster album Jagged Little Pill, tales about mega-producer Glen Ballard, and maybe a little about being a Canadian teen-pop singer and getting slimed after saying “I don’t know” on You Can’t Do That on Television. We don’t know. (Oops.)

Thu., Aug. 30, 8 p.m., 2012

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DEF DEFYING

Mos Def continues to take over the world. The Brooklyn-born hip-hop phenom is back in movie theaters, this time with Jack Black in Michel Gondry’s Be Kind Rewind. So it’s time to check in with this man of music, television, theater, film, and political activism (he’s been busy, for example, on that whole Jena 6 front). Tonight, the 92nd Street Y hosts Mos Def in Conversation with Rolling Stone contributing editor
Anthony DeCurtis, author of In Other Words: Artists Talk About Life and Work. Mos Def, no doubt, will have plenty to discuss—from his experiences in the entertainment industry to the state of the nation.

Thu., Feb. 28, 8 p.m., 2008

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Songs of Free Love and Hate

Somewhere, it’s the witching hour, and a sad sack is holding on for dear life while Leonard Cohen, with his brooding, monochromatic voice, sings, “Well I stepped into an avalanche/It covered up my soul”—the opening line on “Avalanche,” the opening track on the masochistically delightful Songs of Love and Hate. Released in 1970, the lyric can be interpreted as a post-Altamont statement of lost innocence, but more likely it was a far more personal cry from a man disillusioned by his fledgling career as a singer-songwriter.

Three years prior, on the heels of the Summer of Love, Cohen released his debut,
Songs of Leonard Cohen
. He was 33, a late age to come to the game, though it was—not so ironically, for a religious zealot who in ’96 was ordained a Zen Buddhist monk—Christ’s age at passing. But Cohen’s nouveau folk, which bucked the genre’s trend of earnest protest, benefited from his maturity. The album also introduced Cohen’s long line of lady friends living out the repercussions of “free love.”

It was followed, in ’68, by Songs From a Room. Cohen’s tune had changed from casual to political. Songs like “A Bunch of Lonesome Heroes” and “The Old Revolution” were obvious admonishments of the Vietnam War. But it took a deep thinker like Anthony DeCurtis, who wrote the liner notes to these three reissues, to draw parallels between Cohen’s “Story of Isaac” and Bob Dylan’s “Highway 61 Revisited.”

A celebrated poet and novelist in his native Canada even before he released his first album, Cohen’s subsequent musing on avalanches was probably a reaction to the commercial reception—or lack thereof—of his first two albums. Come to think of it, “reactionary” is the perfect theme for these reissues, since the majority of these songs are thinly veiled indictments of the ’60s. Other than the liners, what’s new here are five previously unreleased songs, including less morbid versions of “Bird on the Wire” (originally called “Like a Bird”) and “Dress Rehearsal Rag.” But only “Store Room,” a perky (for Cohen) number about the Man take, take, taking without consequence, proves a real breakthrough. Beyond that, it’s all packaging—a curious homage to the antithesis of superficiality.

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Not Just Johnny’s Girl

Throughout her almost 30 years in the record business, Rosanne Cash has notoriously taken her time between albums—but every one of them has been worth the wait. Her latest, this year’s spare and introspective Black Cadillac, should not be reductively interpreted as a meditation on the loss of her famous father and stepmother; indeed, as she told Paste magazine earlier this year, “it’s not a tribute to him, it’s not any of that.” Fortunately, anyone who knows her work from Seven Year Ache to Interiors to the present knows she’s much more than Johnny’s little girl—with her Americana roots, Buddhist contemplations, and honest voice, Rosanne’s everything the No Depression movement aspires to represent. She’ll unpackage more of her life, her career, and what’s on her mind in a sit-down with Rolling Stone‘s Anthony DeCurtis, one of the true nice guys in music journalism, who knows how to extract it all. Good thing, as the empress of understatement needs to be coaxed sometimes.