Tag: Andrei Rublev

  • Must-Watch (and Maybe-Watch) Movies This Week

    Each week, the Village Voice reviews the dozen or so films that open in theaters both locally and nationwide. Because we understand that you probably won’t read every single one of these reviews (although we think you should give it a try), here’s the definitive guide to what you should watch. You Should Definitely Watch CRIME + […]

  • The Secret of “Andrei Rublev”

    In the most powerful section of Andrei Rublev, Andrei Tarkovsky’s hugely ambitious 1966 epic of medieval Russia, a young man whose village and family have been destroyed by the plague convinces the Grand Prince to let him make a beautiful new bell. The boy, named Boriska (and played by Nikolai Burlyaev with a whipsawing combination […]

  • Marketa Lazarová

    Dir. František Vláčil (1967). František Vláčil’s atmospheric, symbol-charged medieval epic—a wide-screen black-and-white feast for the eyes—has been compared to Akira Kurosawa and Sergio Leone, as well as Tarkovsky’s near-contemporaneous Andrei Rublev. All but unknown here, it was years in the making and is justly considered a national masterpiece by the Czechs. Wed., Feb. 2, 6 […]

  • Stalker

    (Andrei Tarkovsky, 1979). Loosely adapted from a novel by the sci-fi writers Arkady and Boris Strugatsky, Tarkovsky’s last Soviet film is a perverse replay of Solaris’s cosmic voyage, a remake of Andrei Rublev in a secular world of post-apocalyptic misery. (It’s also weirdly evocative of David Lynch’s Eraserhead). Stalker is as devious as it is […]

  • My Name Is Ivan

    (Andrei Tarkovsky, 1962). Tarkovsky’s first feature is a remarkable debut that chronologically fractures a conventional Soviet World War II story about a martyred child scout, while imbuing it with the fiercely lyrical pantheism that would flower in Andrei Rublev. Tue., July 7, 4:15 & 8:30 p.m., 2009

  • Marketa Lazarova

    (Frantisek Vlacil, 1967). Frantisek Vlacil’s atmospheric, symbol-charged medieval epic—a wide-screen black-and-white feast for the eyes—has been compared to Akira Kurosawa and Sergio Leone, as well as Tarkovsky’s near-contemporaneous Andrei Rublev. All but unknown here, it was years in the making and is justly considered a national masterpiece by the Czechs. Mon., June 29, 7:30 p.m., […]